How to Say congratulations_Corporate Event Entertainment

How to Say ‘Congratulations’ in 200+ Popular Languages

(Last Updated On: )

How to say congratulations in different ways? Offering congratulations is an art that requires empathy, thoughtfulness, and respect for the context in which it is given. Crafting the perfect message, understanding the difference between personal and professional situations, and considering non-verbal gestures are all facets of this art. Through sincere and heartfelt congratulations, how to say congratulations in other words, we not only celebrate individual achievements but also strengthen the bonds that connect us in our shared human experience.

The Art of Extending Congratulations

Extending congratulations is an art that transcends mere words. It is a sincere and heartfelt expression of joy, celebration, and appreciation for someone’s achievements or milestones. In the realm of human interaction, offering congratulations serves as a bridge that connects people and strengthens bonds. This act goes beyond a simple declaration; it conveys respect, admiration, and a shared sense of triumph, evoking feelings of warmth and connection.

Understanding the Context

Before delving into the intricacies of extending congratulations, it is crucial to grasp the context in which this expression is to be offered. The context could vary significantly, ranging from personal achievements like graduations and weddings to professional triumphs such as promotions and successful projects. The nature of the event and the relationship between the individuals involved play a pivotal role in shaping the tone and content of the congratulatory message. In personal contexts, the tone may be more emotional and affectionate, while professional situations often call for a more formal and reserved approach.

Crafting the Perfect Message

Crafting a perfect congratulatory message involves a delicate balance between genuine emotion and appropriate language. The message should reflect the depth of your feelings while maintaining respect for the recipient’s sensibilities and the context of the occasion. Choose words that are meaningful and heartfelt, and tailor your message to the individual and their specific accomplishments. Providing details and examples in your message can show that you’ve paid attention to their journey and understand the significance of their achievement.

Personal vs. Professional Congratulations

Personal and professional congratulations require different approaches. In personal situations, you have the liberty to be more expressive and sentimental, weaving in anecdotes or shared memories that underscore the importance of the moment. On the other hand, professional congratulations often necessitate a more formal tone, focusing on the accomplishments and their impact on the organization or industry. Tailoring your message to the appropriate context is essential to convey your sincerity and respect effectively.

The Power of a Handwritten Note

In our increasingly digital world, a handwritten note of congratulations carries a unique charm and significance. The effort and thought put into crafting a handwritten message can leave a lasting impression on the recipient. It shows that you’ve taken the time to carefully compose your thoughts and put pen to paper, making the message more personal and enduring.

Celebrating as a Community

Celebrating achievements is not only an individual’s affair but a collective one. Extending congratulations brings people together, fostering a sense of unity and shared happiness. It creates a ripple effect, inspiring others to strive for their goals and fostering a positive atmosphere. By celebrating together, we reinforce the bonds of friendship, family, and professional relationships.

The Beauty of Non-Verbal Congratulatory Gestures

Congratulating someone isn’t limited to words alone. Non-verbal gestures, such as a warm hug, a handshake, or even a high-five, can be equally powerful in conveying your happiness for someone’s success. These physical expressions of congratulations can transcend language barriers and are particularly meaningful in moments of great emotion.

How to say Welcome in the 10 most common languages

The act of congratulating someone transcends language barriers and cultural divides. Each language brings its unique flavor and nuance to the expression of joy and acknowledgment, enriching the global tapestry of communication and shared celebrations. Here we go with how to say congratulations in other words:

1. English: Congratulations
In the English language, when you want to acknowledge someone’s success or achievement, you convey your felicitations with the word “Congratulations.” This word embodies a sense of acknowledgment and praise, signifying that you share in their joy and applaud their accomplishments.

2. Spanish: Felicidades
In Spanish, the word “Felicidades” is the expression of choice to celebrate someone’s achievements. The word resonates with a warm, heartfelt tone, indicating not only congratulations but also a genuine sense of happiness for the person’s accomplishment.

3. French: Félicitations
In the enchanting French language, “Félicitations” is the term employed to celebrate another’s triumphs. The word carries an air of sophistication and elegance, reflecting the French culture’s appreciation for the finer aspects of life and success.

4. German: Glückwunsch
The German language offers the term “Glückwunsch” to extend congratulations. It embodies the German penchant for precision and efficiency while sharing in someone’s happiness, making it a concise yet meaningful expression.

5. Mandarin Chinese: 恭喜 (Gōngxǐ)
In Mandarin Chinese, the word “恭喜” (Gōngxǐ) serves as the gateway to conveying congratulations. The characters exude a sense of formality and respect, reflecting the deep-rooted traditions and values of Chinese culture.

6. Hindi: बधाई हो (Badhā’ī ho)
Hindi, with its rich tapestry of words, employs “बधाई हो” (Badhā’ī ho) to celebrate achievements. The phrase carries a cultural vibrancy, uniting individuals in shared joy while recognizing their accomplishments.

7. Arabic: مبروك (Mabrook)
In the Arabic language, the term “مبروك” (Mabrook) is the embodiment of congratulations. It resonates with a sense of camaraderie, acknowledging the significance of the moment while conveying best wishes for continued success.

8. Russian: Поздравляю (Pozdravlyayu)
Russian employs the word “Поздравляю” (Pozdravlyayu) to extend congratulations. The sound of this word carries a certain gravitas, underscoring the importance of the moment and the shared sense of achievement.

9. Portuguese: Parabéns
The Portuguese language, with its melodic qualities, employs “Parabéns” to offer congratulations. The word is infused with warmth and sincerity, reflecting the cultural emphasis on celebrating one another’s successes.

10. Japanese: おめでとう (Omedetou)
In Japanese, the word “おめでとう” (Omedetou) is the expression used to mark an accomplishment. It conveys respect, acknowledging the person’s hard work and celebrating their achievement in a manner that reflects the nuanced politeness of Japanese culture.

How to say Welcome in African languages

Let’s find below how to say congratulations in another way in African

  1. Igbo – Nke a bu ezigbo ezigbo onye: In Igbo, a language spoken predominantly in southeastern Nigeria, congratulating someone is expressed as “Nke a bu ezigbo ezigbo onye.”
  2. Swahili – Hongera: Swahili, a widely spoken language in East Africa, uses “Hongera” as a term for congratulations.
  3. Yoruba – Od’igba: Yoruba, a language native to the Yoruba people in Nigeria and parts of Benin, uses “Od’igba” for congratulations.
  4. Hausa – Barka: In Hausa, a language spoken in West Africa, particularly in Nigeria and Niger, the term for congratulations is “Barka.”
  5. Zulu – Amancotsho: Zulu, a Bantu language widely spoken in South Africa, uses “Amancotsho” to congratulate someone.
  6. Amharic – Melkam Yilakal: In Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia, you can express congratulations with “Melkam Yilakal.”
  7. Kinyarwanda – Amahirwe: Kinyarwanda, a Bantu language spoken in Rwanda and neighboring countries, uses “Amahirwe” for congratulations.
  8. Kikuyu – Gukirira: Kikuyu, a Bantu language spoken by the Kikuyu people in Kenya, uses “Gukirira” to convey congratulations.
  9. Tigrinya – Merhaba: Tigrinya, spoken in Eritrea and parts of Ethiopia, uses “Merhaba” to say congratulations.
  10. Oromo – Daalguddaa: In Oromo, a language spoken in Ethiopia and parts of Kenya, “Daalguddaa” is used for congratulations.
  11. Somali – Mudanayaasho: The Somali language, spoken in the Horn of Africa, uses “Mudanayaasho” to convey congratulations.
  12. Sesotho – U Rata Hantle: In Sesotho, the official language of Lesotho, you can say “U Rata Hantle” to congratulate someone.
  13. Ibibio – Ndiaman: Ibibio, a language spoken in Nigeria, uses “Ndiaman” for congratulations.
  14. Chichewa – Zikomo: Chichewa, spoken in Malawi and parts of Zambia, uses “Zikomo” to express congratulations.
  15. Yoruba – Od’igba: Yoruba, a language native to the Yoruba people in Nigeria and parts of Benin, uses “Od’igba” for congratulations.
  16. Kinyarwanda – Amahirwe: Kinyarwanda, a Bantu language spoken in Rwanda and neighboring countries, uses “Amahirwe” for congratulations.
  17. Tigrinya – Merhaba: Tigrinya, spoken in Eritrea and parts of Ethiopia, uses “Merhaba” to say congratulations.
  18. Oromo – Daalguddaa: In Oromo, a language spoken in Ethiopia and parts of Kenya, “Daalguddaa” is used for congratulations.
  19. Somali – Mudanayaasho: The Somali language, spoken in the Horn of Africa, uses “Mudanayaasho” to convey congratulations.
  20. Sesotho – U Rata Hantle: In Sesotho, the official language of Lesotho, you can say “U Rata Hantle” to congratulate someone.
  21. Ibibio – Ndiaman: Ibibio, a language spoken in Nigeria, uses “Ndiaman” for congratulations.
  22. Chichewa – Zikomo: Chichewa, spoken in Malawi and parts of Zambia, uses “Zikomo” to express congratulations.
  23. Ganda – Webale: Ganda, a Bantu language spoken in Uganda, uses “Webale” to say congratulations.
  24. Xhosa – Amazwi Amnandi: In Xhosa, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, “Amazwi Amnandi” is used for congratulations.
  25. Tigrigna – Melkam Lidet: In Tigrigna, spoken in Eritrea and parts of Ethiopia, “Melkam Lidet” is used for congratulations.
  26. Chewa – Zikomo: Chewa, spoken in Malawi and parts of Zambia, uses “Zikomo” to express congratulations.
  27. Sotho – U Rata Hantle: In Sotho, an official language of Lesotho, you can say “U Rata Hantle” to congratulate someone.
  28. Kwanyama – Ondangi: Kwanyama, a Bantu language spoken in Namibia, uses “Ondangi” for congratulations.
  29. Shona – Ruregerero: Shona, spoken in Zimbabwe and neighboring countries, uses “Ruregerero” to say congratulations.
  30. Tsonga – Ndzi ku navelela: In Tsonga, spoken in southern Africa, “Ndzi ku navelela” is used to congratulate someone.
  31. Wolof – Nopp naa la: Wolof, spoken in Senegal and the Gambia, uses “Nopp naa la” for congratulations.
  32. Fon – Akolo: In Fon, a language spoken in Benin and parts of Nigeria and Togo, “Akolo” is used to congratulate someone.
  33. Dinka – Muoy Aciak: Dinka, a Nilotic language spoken in South Sudan, uses “Muoy Aciak” to express congratulations.
  34. Bambara – Samogo: Bambara, spoken in Mali and surrounding regions, uses “Samogo” for congratulations.
  35. Wolof – Nopp naa la: Wolof, spoken in Senegal and the Gambia, uses “Nopp naa la” for congratulations.
  36. Fon – Akolo: In Fon, a language spoken in Benin and parts of Nigeria and Togo, “Akolo” is used to congratulate someone.
  37. Dinka – Muoy Aciak: Dinka, a Nilotic language spoken in South Sudan, uses “Muoy Aciak” to express congratulations.
  38. Bambara – Samogo: Bambara, spoken in Mali and surrounding regions, uses “Samogo” for congratulations.
  39. Chichewa – Zikomo: Chichewa, spoken in Malawi and parts of Zambia, uses “Zikomo” to express congratulations.
  40. Ganda – Webale: Ganda, a Bantu language spoken in Uganda, uses “Webale” to say congratulations.
  41. Xhosa – Amazwi Amnandi: In Xhosa, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, “Amazwi Amnandi” is used for congratulations.

How to Say Welcome in 50 Popular European Languages

This linguistic odyssey through Europe demonstrates the richness of human expression, as each language adds its unique cultural and historical dimensions to the act of congratulating. Whether you’re celebrating a personal achievement or extending your best wishes to a friend, these diverse linguistic gems allow you to do so with a touch of elegance and cultural appreciation.

  1. English – Congratulations
  2. French – Félicitations
  3. Spanish – Felicidades
  4. Italian – Congratulazioni
  5. German – Glückwünsche
  6. Portuguese – Parabéns
  7. Dutch – Gefeliciteerd
  8. Russian – Поздравления (Pozdravleniya)
  9. Greek – Συγχαρητήρια (Sygcharitíria)
  10. Polish – Gratulacje
  11. Swedish – Grattis
  12. Finnish – Onnittelut
  13. Danish – Tillykke
  14. Norwegian – Gratulerer
  15. Icelandic – Til hamingju
  16. Turkish – Tebrikler
  17. Hungarian – Gratulálok
  18. Romanian – Felicitări
  19. Czech – Gratulace
  20. Slovak – Gratulujem
  21. Bulgarian – Поздравления (Pozdravleniya)
  22. Serbian – Честитке (Čestitke)
  23. Croatian – Čestitke
  24. Slovenian – Čestitam
  25. Macedonian – Честитки (Čestitki)
  26. Albanian – Urime
  27. Estonian – Õnnitlused
  28. Latvian – Apsveikumi
  29. Lithuanian – Sveikinimai
  30. Ukrainian – Вітання (Vitannya)
  31. Belarusian – Вітанні (Vitanni)
  32. Georgian – გილოცავთ (Gilotsavt)
  33. Armenian – Շնորհավորում եմ (Shnorhavorum em)
  34. Azerbaijani – Təbriklər
  35. Kazakh – Құттықтаймын (Quttıqtaymın)
  36. Uzbek – Tabriklayman
  37. Tajik – Табрик медиҳам (Tabrik medihəm)
  38. Kyrgyz – Бактылуу болушун куттуктуу (Baqtıluu boluşun quttuqtuu)
  39. Turkmen – Begendim
  40. Greek – Συγχαρητήρια (Sygcharitíria)
  41. Slovak – Gratulálok
  42. Basque – Zorionak
  43. Galician – Parabéns
  44. Catalan – Felicitats
  45. Irish – Comhghairdeas
  46. Scottish Gaelic – Meal do naidheachd
  47. Welsh – Llongyfarchiadau
  48. Breton – Gourc’hemennoù
  49. Lithuanian – Sveikinimai
  50. Maltese – Prosit

how to say congratulations in different ways
how to say congratulations in another way
how to say congratulations in other words

How to Say Congratulations in Asian Languages

Here’s how to say “Congratulations” in 50 Asian languages:

  1. Arabic – مبروك (Mabrouk)
  2. Persian (Farsi) – تبریک (Tabrik)
  3. Turkish – Tebrikler
  4. Kazakh – Құттықтаймыз (Quttıqtaymız)
  5. Kurdish – Pîroz be
  6. Pashto – مبارک شه (Mubarak sha)
  7. Tajik – Табрик медорам (Tabrik medoram)
  8. Uzbek – Tabriklayman
  9. Hindi – बधाई हो (Badhai ho)
  10. Bengali – অভিনন্দন (Abhinandan)
  11. Tamil – வாழ்த்துக்கள் (Vāḻttukkaḷ)
  12. Telugu – అభినందనలు (Abhinandanalu)
  13. Punjabi – ਮੁਬਾਰਕ (Mubārak)
  14. Marathi – अभिनंदन (Abhinandan)
  15. Gujarati – શુભકામના (Śubhakāmanā)
  16. Malayalam – അഭിനന്ദനങ്ങൾ (Abhinandanangal)
  17. Urdu – مبارک ہو (Mubarak ho)
  18. Nepali – शुभकामना (Shubhakamana)
  19. Sinhala – සුභපැටවෙනි (Subhapaṭaweni)
  20. Tibetan – ལོ་གསུབ (Lo gsus)
  21. Burmese – မြတ်နိုင်မုန့် (Mrit nuinmun)
  22. Khmer (Cambodian) – សូមអបអរសាទរ (Sombok arey sat)
  23. Thai – ขอแสดงความยินดี (K̄hx s̄ādng khwām yindi)
  24. Lao – ການກິດຕິ (Kān khid ti)
  25. Vietnamese – Chúc mừng
  26. Malay – Tahniah
  27. Indonesian – Selamat
  28. Filipino/Tagalog – Pagbati
  29. Japanese – おめでとう (Omedetou)
  30. Korean – 축하해 (Chuk-ha-hae)
  31. Chinese (Mandarin) – 恭喜 (Gōngxǐ)
  32. Cantonese – 恭喜 (Gung hei)
  33. Taiwanese Hokkien – 恭喜 (Kiong-hi)
  34. Mongolian – Мэндчилгээ (Mendchilgee)
  35. Nepali – शुभकामना (Shubhakamana)
  36. Bhutanese – བྱང་ཆུ (Byang chu)
  37. Dzongkha (Bhutan) – བྱང་ཆུ (Byang chu)
  38. Tamil (Sri Lanka/India) – வாழ்த்துக்கள் (Vāḻttukkaḷ)
  39. Sindhi – مبارڪ ٿا (Mubāraka ṭhā)
  40. Uighur – تەبرىكلىمەن (Tébriqlimen)
  41. Kyrgyz – Тебрик көрсөтүңүз (Tebrik körstüñüz)
  42. Tajik – Табрик медорам (Tabrik medoram)
  43. Azerbaijani – Təbriklər
  44. Kazakh – Құттықтау (Quttıqtaw)
  45. Turkmen – Gutly bol
  46. Georgian – გილოცავთ (Gilotsavt)
  47. Tigrinya (Eritrea) – ኣመልካታት (Amləkatat)
  48. Amharic (Ethiopia) – እንዴት (ʾEndät)
  49. Somali – Mudan
  50. Swahili – Hongera

How to Say Congratulations in Middle Eastern Languages

Here’s how to say “Congratulations” in 30 Middle Eastern languages:

Arabic Dialects:

Arabic (Standard) – مبروك (Mabrouk)
Egyptian Arabic – مبروك (Mabrouk)
Levantine Arabic – مبروك (Mabrouk)
Maghrebi Arabic (Morocco/Algeria/Tunisia) – مبروك (Mabrouk)
Gulf Arabic – مبروك (Mabrouk)
Yemeni Arabic – مبروك (Mabrouk)

Persian (Farsi) Dialects:

Farsi (Persian) – تبریک (Tavallod)
Tajik (Tajikistan) – Табрикот (Tabrikot)

Turkic Languages:

Turkish – Tebrikler
Azeri (Azerbaijan) – Təbrik edirəm
Kazakh (Kazakhstan) – Тұқымас жазамыз (Tukhyamas jazamız)

Kurdish Dialects:

Kurdish (Kurmanji) – Pîroz be
Kurdish (Sorani) – Pîroz be

Hebrew Dialects:

Hebrew (Israel) – מזל טוב (Mazal Tov)
Yiddish (Jewish communities) – מזל טוב (Mazel tov)

Semitic Languages:

Assyrian Neo-Aramaic – ܫܠܡܐ ܚܕ ܒܟܠܗ (Shlama Khad b’Khula)
Armenian (Western Armenian) – Շնորհավոր (Shnorhavor)
Armenian (Eastern Armenian) – Շնորհաւատ (Shnorhavat)

Coptic and African Languages:

Coptic (Egypt) – Ⲟⲩϩⲏⲧ (Oouhit)
Amharic (Ethiopia) – እውነት አስተያጅ (Ewenet Asityaj)
Tigrinya (Eritrea/Ethiopia) – ኣብረስ (Abreris)

Indo-Aryan Languages:

Hindi (India) – बधाई (Badhai)
Urdu (Pakistan/India) – مبارک ہو (Mubarak ho)

Kazakh and Central Asian Languages:

Kazakh (Kazakhstan) – Тұқтымсың (Tuqtımsıñ)
Kyrgyz (Kyrgyzstan) – Тубул болсун (Tubul bolsun)
Turkmen (Turkmenistan) – Gutly bolsun
Uzbek (Uzbekistan) – Tabriklayman

South Asian Languages:

Pashto (Afghanistan/Pakistan) – مبارک شئ (Mubarak sha)
Dari (Afghanistan) – مبارکه (Mubarakah)
Tajik (Tajikistan) – Табрикот (Tabrikot)

Please note that pronunciation and script may vary among different dialects and regions within these languages.

How to Say Welcome in Austronesian Languages

Here’s how to say “Congratulations” in 30 Austronesian languages:

Tagalog (Philippines) – Pagbati
Malay/Indonesian – Selamat
Javanese (Indonesia) – Sugeng
Cebuano (Philippines) – Pasidungog
Hawaiian (Hawaii) – Ho’omaika’i
Samoan (Samoa) – Fa’afetai
Maori (New Zealand) – Ngā mihi
Fijian (Fiji) – Vinaka
Tahitian (French Polynesia) – ‘Ānani
Chamorro (Guam) – Biba
Tongan (Tonga) – Malo
Sundanese (Indonesia) – Wilujeng
Ilocano (Philippines) – Naragsak
Sinhalese (Sri Lanka) – සුභ
Bikol (Philippines) – Magayon
Bislama (Vanuatu) – Gudfala
Sundanese (Indonesia) – Wilujeng
Tetum (East Timor) – Parabens
Sasak (Indonesia) – Selametan
Waray-Waray (Philippines) – Maupay
Kadazan (Malaysia) – Mongi
Palauan (Palau) – Sulang
Tetum (East Timor) – Parabens
Rapa (Rapa Island, French Polynesia) – Maeva
Chuukese (Federated States of Micronesia) – Kaselehlie
Tahitian (French Polynesia) – ‘Ānani
Yapese (Federated States of Micronesia) – Roor
Marquesan (French Polynesia) – Ho’i
Chuukese (Federated States of Micronesia) – Kaselehlie
Batak (Philippines) – Makatanda

Please note that pronunciation may vary among different dialects and regions within these languages.

How to Say Welcome in the Languages of Americas

Here’s how to say “Congratulations” in 40 languages spoken in the Americas:

North America:

English (USA/Canada) – Congratulations
French (Canada) – Félicitations
Spanish (Mexico) – Felicidades
Inuktitut (Canada) – ᓇᑦᑎᖅᑐᖅ (Nattiqatut)
Ojibwe (USA/Canada) – Mino-aawaa
Cree (Canada) – ᒨᑖᑕᐤ (Môswâ)
Navajo (USA) – Hózhǫ́ǫ́go
Cherokee (USA) – ᎩᎦᎨᏳ (Gigageyu)

Central America:

Spanish (Guatemala) – Felicidades
K’iche’ (Guatemala) – K’oolik
Kaqchikel (Guatemala) – K’oolik
Spanish (El Salvador) – Felicidades
Pipil (El Salvador) – Chalti
Spanish (Honduras) – Felicidades
Miskito (Honduras/Nicaragua) – Buhrbiya
Spanish (Nicaragua) – Felicidades
Rama (Nicaragua) – Imishka
Spanish (Costa Rica) – Felicidades
Bribri (Costa Rica/Panama) – Moi bukör
Spanish (Panama) – Felicidades
Ngäbere (Panama/Costa Rica) – Hmröbär
Maya Kaqchikel (Guatemala) – Nq’atzij
Maya Mam (Guatemala) – Ri li k’aslemtej

Caribbean:

Spanish (Cuba) – Felicidades
Haitian Creole (Haiti) – Felisitasyon
Jamaican Patois (Jamaica) – Congratuliet
Spanish (Dominican Republic) – Felicidades
Taino (extinct) – Maco
Spanish (Puerto Rico) – Felicidades
Garifuna (Honduras/Belize) – Lúgaduruni
Papiamento (Aruba/Curacao/Bonaire) – Kon gratulo

South America:

Spanish (Argentina) – Felicidades
Quechua (Peru/Bolivia/Ecuador) – Rihsinchi
Aymara (Bolivia/Peru) – Sum juchanaki
Portuguese (Brazil) – Parabéns
Guarani (Paraguay) – Aguyje
Spanish (Venezuela) – Felicidades
Wayuu (Colombia/Venezuela) – Jatuleja
Dutch (Suriname) – Gefeliciteerd
Creole (French Guiana) – Bon Kouté

Please note that pronunciation may vary among different dialects and regions. Learning Language Guide, Speaking, Reading, Writing, Listening Skills

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *